The restocking fee at $120 for a product that costs $700 is not bad. It’s not great, but it’s not terrible either. But then you’ve got to wonder, if you could make a garbage product for $30 and rent it out for six months for $120, could you make money? The answer is a definitive yes. The 6 month money back guarantee is nothing to brag about because of the high restocking fee. I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t tempted, but the restocking fee makes me cringe just a bit.


Reviewers seem to always think that their personal case applies to everyone and make definitive statements like “don’t waste your money” or “it works”. Each user will respond differently to laser light therapy for hair loss. Hair growth response will depend on the type of hair loss, skin tone, skin thickness, and dosage. Certain types of hair loss will not respond to laser light therapy, no matter what…this product and ones like it will not work for some people. If it doesn’t work for you, then you may fall within this category and there’s no point in telling others that it doesn’t work and not to waste money. These types of products may also be less effective in people with a darker skin tone. Melanin in skin absorbs light. Likewise, melanin in skin will absorb the light coming from these products. The darker you are, the more melanin you have, and the more absorption of light…those with darker skin tone may want to increase dosage (speak with a trichologist first). About dosage, go to pubmed.com and find articles that reviewed laser light therapy dosage. You’ll find that there is a very broad range of length of time and frequency of application…some articles say 2-3 times a week while others say up to 40 times a week. Once again, we’re all different and dosage with respect to time and frequency will depend on the individual. A user must also consider how penetration of light into the skin has an influence on efficacy. Penetration of light will depend on the level of intensity of light, the thickness of a user’s skin, and the distance of the light from the skin, (as well as the melanin concentration as stated above). The iGrow helmet has its own standard of light intensity, while other devices may have a different intensity of light. The intensity and distance of light to a user’s scalp are probably the most important factors that will determine penetration of light into the skin. Optimal penetration needs to occur for this type of therapy to work. I’m assuming iGrow has figured out the optimal distance and intensity of light for best results.
Knowing that the medical device business is challenging to break into I wanted to know what the biggest hurdle has been for the Apira Science team. “When you pioneer a new technology you face severe challenges in credibility and consumer acceptance. You have the dual challenge of convincing both consumers as well as their physicians, who are normally skeptical of the efficacy of these devices and the credibility of the company. We have found that the “science sells,” but in today’s ever-changing environment traditional sources of retail are less prevalent, and digital assets and specialists are required to help navigate these changing waters”, states Braile.
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